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Saturday, July 20, 2019

Madeleine McCann FaceApp-style tech could help crack case:

By Patrick Knox

THE hunt for missing Madeleine McCann could be boosted after a FaceApp-style AI was used to reunite a Chinese man with his family 18 years after being abducted.

Yu Weifeng shortly before his disappearance aged three

Yu Weifeng, 21, was reunited with his family yesterday after police used the technology to predict what the missing lad would look like as a grown man before searching a huge database. 

The AI used by the police was able to predict with high accuracy what the missing boy might look like now – much like the recently trending FaceApp.

Cold-case investigators in Shenzhen’s Futian District, which is in South China’s Guangdong Province, were then able to couple the Tencent AI Lab predictions.
The software spent about two months sorting through nearly 100 candidates before singling out Weifeng, who is a student in the provincial capital Guangzhou.

Investigator Zheng Zhenhai said: “When he found him, he refused to believe that he was a kidnapped child, but DNA confirmed that he was a match with his biological parents.”

Weifeng, whose adoptive parents had given him the family name Li, went missing on 6th May 2001 while playing near a construction site where his dad worked as a foreman.

Zheng added: “We opened the case the day after the incident and we never gave up.
“Technology was limited at the time. 
“We checked surveillance footage, but there were simply too many people coming in and out of the area.”

There are many cases of abducted children being found and returned to their families — even after long periods of time.

The technology could now boost the search for Madeleine McCann, who went vanishing from Praia da Luz in 2007 then aged three.

It comes as British tourists were being urged to take posters of Madeleine on their holidays in a bid to find her.

The official Find Madeleine Campaign website says: “Fortunately, there are many cases of abducted children being found and returned to their families — even after long periods of time. 

“The vital piece of information that leads to a happy and longed-for reunion is usually thanks to a caring and vigilant member of the general public, often recognising a face from a poster.”

After Weifeng was found, investigator Zheng Zhenhai said: “When he found him, he refused to believe that he was a kidnapped child, but DNA confirmed that he was a match with his biological parents.
“We opened the case the day after the incident, and we never gave up.

“Technology was limited at the time. We checked surveillance footage, but there were simply too many people coming in and out of the area.”


His emotional dad added: “We’re also very grateful to his foster parents for raising him for 18 years. From now on, his foster father will become like a brother to me; my son will have two dads.”


Thursday, July 18, 2019

Trinity Mount Ministries - DOJ - PROJECT SAFE CHILDHOOD - Justice News - UPDATE

PROJECT SAFE CHILDHOOD

Project Safe Childhood
Project Safe Childhood is a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice.  Led by the U.S. Attorneys' Offices and the Criminal Division's Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

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Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Children Won’t Say They Have Anxiety, They Say ‘My Stomach Hurts!’

By Debi Allison


As children grow and develop, they experience a number of emotional reactions that they know are different or even negative feelings, but they haven’t the experience to understand what they are dealing with. However, they will let us know when something is wrong even when they aren’t entirely sure of what it is.


While children may look at things differently than we do, giving them a deeper insight into another outlook on any given situation- they aren’t as educated or self-aware as an adult. To them, their feelings that are constantly changing and evolving can be confusing, and putting a definite prognosis on their health isn’t likely. Instead, they will tell us their symptoms, awaiting our experience and wisdom for help.
However, up until recently, most adults were completely unaware of the prominence of childhood mental disorders, other than ADHD and the other run of the mill behavioral issues experienced by children. And even in adulthood, it seems that anxiety isn’t taken as seriously as it should be, because most people think that anxiety is simply the occurrence of a normal fear taking hold of us.
But anxiety is much more than that and can be quite consuming for the person dealing with it.
What child doesn’t have a moment in which they cower behind their parents because it is dark outside, or because they heard a loud noise? In these situations, the child is anxious, but rightfully so, leaving no cause for concern. But, in some cases, children can develop an anxiety disorder which will affect their relationships, their education, and their overall quality of life.
Recent statistics have shown us that at least 1 out of every 8 children develops an anxiety disorder. If left untreated, the initial anxiety disorder can transpire into difficulty maintaining and developing connections with their peers, severe sleep disturbance, and substance dependency.
Sadly untreated anxiety can leave your child feeling as though they are worthless, and in turn they may not excel academically, leaving them short of reaching their full potential. Depression is often a result of an untreated childhood anxiety disorder as well. So, how can we make a difference in the outcome of this often tragic scenario?
Learn to pay attention to your child’s cry for help. Sometimes, their expression of anxiety will be much different than you would expect, so it helps to stay in tune with their triggers.

Look For These Signs:

-Constant stomach aches during stressful situations

– Agitation

– Restless behavior

– Avoiding people/situations that could even slightly stress them out

– Meltdowns over slight issues

– Difficulty transitioning

– Extreme perfectionism

– Strange coping mechanisms that could be considered as self-harm (biting, scratching, pinching or even the pulling of their own hair)


If you notice your child is constantly stressing, to the point of it intervening in their day to day activities, seek the help of a trusted therapist. Catching the symptoms early can mean a better probability for therapeutic intervention, meaning medicine may not even be necessary. Above all- listen to your child, within reason. Use your better judgment and stay tuned into your child’s normal behaviors and habits. Doing these simple things can make all the difference in the world.

Monday, July 15, 2019

Football Player Wears Handprint On His Face To Bring Attention To Missing Native Women

By Tammy Ayer - Yakima Herald-Republic

Shoulderblade-Sampson, who played football for Yakama Nation Tribal School and graduated in June, gestures at the Indigenous Bowl in Soboba, Calif., on June 29. About 40 high school football players from throughout the United States and one from Canada participated. Shoulderblade-Sampson and the Canadian player, Nick Wakos, wore black handprints on their faces at the game.

Kyal S 18, of Toppenish, left, takes a stand for missing and murdered indigenous women and girls at the second annual Indigenous Bowl in Soboba, Calif., on June 29. He and his girlfriend had talked about how he could bring attention to the issue like other young Native athletes, including Rosalie “Rosy” Fish. She dedicated the four races she ran in the 1B small-school state track and field meet in late May to particular missing or murdered indigenous women.

Tammy Ayer - Yakima Herald-Republic

TOPPENISH — Before he left for the Indigenous Bowl a few weeks ago, Kyal Shoulderblade-Sampson talked with his girlfriend about taking a stand on an important issue.

Shoulderblade-Sampson, who played football for Yakama Nation Tribal School and graduated in June, was aware of another Native athlete, Rosalie “Rosy” Fish of Muckleshoot Tribal School, who raised awareness for missing and murdered indigenous women. Fish had a red handprint across her face and “MMIW” in red letters on her right leg while competing at the 1B small-school state track and field meet May 23-25 in Cheney.

Fish won three of four races, finishing second in the other. She dedicated each race to a particular woman, highlighting them with photos and information on a display she made for the meet. Shoulderblade-Sampson was there, too, competing in the 4x400.


“I was thinking about (Fish) and her stand, and I wished I would have done the same thing. She brought attention to a cause that’s being swept under the carpet,” said Shoulderblade-Sampson, who is 18 and the son of Robert Sampson and Billie Shoulderblade. He is Yakama and lives in Toppenish.

He showed his girlfriend, Annie Heemsah, a photo and mentioned his idea. They talked about it.

“It’s an Indigenous Bowl, and Natives will be looking at it. I thought it would be a good thing to do,” Shoulderblade-Sampson said. “My mind was set on buying black paint.”

The handprint represents indigenous people who have been silenced by violence.

On June 29, he played in the second annual Indigenous Bowl in Soboba, Calif., with a black handprint on his face. So did the sole participant from Canada, Nick Wakos of Sagkeeng First Nation. The two had met and hung out in the days before the game and and were the only players with black handprints on their faces.

“He’s a cool guy,” Shoulderblade-Sampson, a wide receiver and linebacker, said of Wakos. “I had no idea he was going to do it until that game day.”

Wakos told CBC News he wanted the image to be seen by American players and his friends back home.

“It was a message for teens and youth to step up in their community,” he said, noting the number of missing women from his First Nation, some of whom he knew.

For Shoulderblade-Sampson, wearing a black handprint was “more for the general idea of it,” he said. The issue impacts entire Native communities, including those without lost or murdered loved ones.

“Honestly, it’s important to me because I’m Native. It’s not just my family being affected (or) my friend’s family being affected; it’s the (entire) Native family being affected,” he said.

“I’d like for more men to stand up and notice. It’s pretty gut-wrenching to know that Native American woman are being taken.”

Shoulderblade-Sampson, Wakos and Fish are among a growing number of young Native athletes taking a stand for missing and murdered indigenous people and demanding action to end a legacy of violence that has continued unabated for centuries.

Fish, who graduated and will compete for Iowa Central Community College this fall, ran the state final of the 1,600 for her relative Alice Ida Looney, who disappeared from Wapato in mid-August 2004. A hunter found her body in late November 2005 amid dense brush on a small island in Satus Creek, about 12 miles southeast of Toppenish. The FBI lists the cause of Looney’s death as inconclusive.

No one knows exactly how many women have gone missing from the Yakama Reservation. Many cases of missing people or mysterious deaths of women and men remain unsolved. At one point during an FBI investigation spurred by rumors of a serial killer, investigators found as many as 32 dating back to 1980.

Young men need to take a stand on the issue, Shoulderblade-Sampson said. Native men in general should take an active role in ensuring the safety of the women and girls of their communities, he said.

“My friend Nick, he mentioned men stepping up to protect the women,” he added. “I think that’s a huge point.”

Though for now he plans to attend Heritage University, Shoulderblade-Sampson hopes he can keep playing his favorite sport in college. He participated in the Indigenous Bowl with fellow Yakama Nation Tribal School player Jake Castilleja, who will play for the College of the Siskiyous in northern California.

Their coach, Keri Ewing, who has since left the tribal school for southern Oregon, spoke highly of Shoulderblade-Sampson. Ewing noted that he was a 2018-19 MaxPreps/USA Football Player of the Week nominee. Shoulderblade-Sampson also was his school’s 2018 Offensive Player of the Year.

“Kyal was great. I got there right after football season the year before (and) Kyal was one of the first ones in my weightlifting class. ... Pretty soon Jake was in there. I had six kids showing up every morning. That was a cool thing,” he said.

“Our season started off kind of rough, but we finished the season really well. You could see that there was a change from people just playing the sport to loving it, and Kyal was a huge part of that,” Ewing added. “Kyal, he’s kind of the embodiment ... of tribal school football, what I wanted it to become. He worked hard.”

Ewing was “pumped” when he saw a photo of Shoulderblade-Sampson with the black handprint across his face, but he wasn’t surprised.

“Kyal’s like that. He’ll take a stand for something he believes in, do what he can,” Ewing said. “I think that’s good. I was proud. to see that.”

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Conspiracy of Silence (1993) - Unaired Documentary

"Conspiracy of Silence" is a Discovery Channel documentary that never aired from 1993, concerning high level government officials involved in child sex trafficking and abuse. 

An important and powerful testimony of alleged government corruption and cover-up, using intimation and scare tactics to silence the child victims and those who attempted to expose the government officials involved in this child sexual abuse ring.

Watch this banned documentary for yourself and draw your own conclusions concerning the testimonies of the child abuse victims and those who tried to give them a voice - so that this conspiracy will no longer be hidden and covered up, ending the reign of silence.


Sunday, July 7, 2019

Trinity Mount Ministries - DOJ - PROJECT SAFE CHILDHOOD - Justice News Update

PROJECT SAFE CHILDHOOD

Project Safe Childhood
Project Safe Childhood is a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice.  Led by the U.S. Attorneys' Offices and the Criminal Division's Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

JUSTICE NEWS

RESOURCES

Read the Project Safe Childhood Fact Sheet »

PSC Fact Sheets

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